1. Gloria Rodríguez, Lisboa, 2013

    Gloria Rodríguez, Lisboa, 2013

    18 August 2014

    reblogged from: gloriaphoto | notes: 62 | download image

     
     
  2. Atget, Charles Meryon & Rue des Chantres

After writing about Atget, Kertész and Google’s photographs of a small street last year, I was in Paris and made a detour to the center to see what is happening at the Rue des Chantres. I shot the above photo trying to approximate the Atget, but I use a Rolleiflex, and did not crop the square to match Atget’s ratio.



Searching for more history of Rue des Chantres, I came across this etching by Charles Meryon, 60 years before Atget’s photograph. The photograph of Rue des Chantres seems to be a direct quotation of the Meryon. The photograph and sketch are taken from the top of stairs, and Atget’s use of tripod would have limited where he would/could set up the camera. Meryon’s etching features an interesting moment, which seems to be a group of men, with a few soldiers. A woman and her child walk around them to avoid what seems to be a fight. 

 Meryon was a popular artist and source for photographers. Here’s some background from Marja Warehime’s book on Brassaï (bottom of page 49), where it’s mentioned Meryon would sometimes base his work on daguerreotypes. While using different mediums, Meryon and Atget were in the same line of work, documenting architecture and scenes around Paris.

In the Kertész photo, you glimpse inside a tiny bar where people are huddled, drinking during the day, below the sign documenting the flood of 1910 (“CRUE”). A bar in a medieval-sized alley is bound to give an American those feelings Americans have about European street life, but nooks like this are now filled in with million euro pied-à-terres; the area around Notre Dame is a permanent Martin Parr zone.

    Atget, Charles Meryon & Rue des Chantres

    After writing about Atget, Kertész and Google’s photographs of a small street last year, I was in Paris and made a detour to the center to see what is happening at the Rue des Chantres. I shot the above photo trying to approximate the Atget, but I use a Rolleiflex, and did not crop the square to match Atget’s ratio.

    Searching for more history of Rue des Chantres, I came across this etching by Charles Meryon, 60 years before Atget’s photograph. The photograph of Rue des Chantres seems to be a direct quotation of the Meryon. The photograph and sketch are taken from the top of stairs, and Atget’s use of tripod would have limited where he would/could set up the camera. Meryon’s etching features an interesting moment, which seems to be a group of men, with a few soldiers. A woman and her child walk around them to avoid what seems to be a fight.

    Meryon was a popular artist and source for photographers. Here’s some background from Marja Warehime’s book on Brassaï (bottom of page 49), where it’s mentioned Meryon would sometimes base his work on daguerreotypes. While using different mediums, Meryon and Atget were in the same line of work, documenting architecture and scenes around Paris.

    In the Kertész photo, you glimpse inside a tiny bar where people are huddled, drinking during the day, below the sign documenting the flood of 1910 (“CRUE”). A bar in a medieval-sized alley is bound to give an American those feelings Americans have about European street life, but nooks like this are now filled in with million euro pied-à-terres; the area around Notre Dame is a permanent Martin Parr zone.

     
     
  3. Albert Grondahl

    Albert Grondahl

    16 August 2014

    reblogged from: mpdrolet | notes: 216 | tagged: the arms | download image

     
     
  4. Nakeya Janice Brown, Sealing Ends- Part II, 2014

    Nakeya Janice Brown, Sealing Ends- Part II, 2014

    15 August 2014 | source: nakeyab

    reblogged from: britticisms | notes: 1448 | tagged: the arms | download image

     
     
  5. Fette Sans, Untitled, 2014

    Fette Sans, Untitled, 2014

    15 August 2014

    reblogged from: fette | notes: 28 | tagged: the arms | download image

     
     
  6. Oscar Grant’s photograph of  Johannes Mehserle
This is a reblog of a post from several years ago. One feature of a militarized state is the suppression of civilian photography. 

Oscar Grant’s photograph of transit police officer Johannes Mehserle is rare: a portrait of the photographer’s killer. Unlike the  recent photograph that a politician captured in the Philippines, Grant’s photograph, taken moments before Mehserle shot him in the back, was intentional.

Much of the media attention given to the Oscar Grant case focused on a handful of videos made by other passengers on the BART train, some of which show Grant being shot. While being detained by BART police, Grant called his ex-girlfriend Sophina Mesa twice from the platform. During this time he also took the photo of Mehserle and sent it to Mesa. Grant’s photograph of Mehserle did not get as much coverage as the videos, as it wasn’t released until the trial began.

Grant’s photograph raises an important issue that faces every American: the right to photograph, videotape and document while being  detained or arrested by the police. Many of us assume we have this right, but with existing  wiretapping laws, you can still be arrested and your camera confiscated. Radley Balko’s Reason.com article “The War on Cameras" is essential reading on this subject.


Demian Bulwa is a reporter and editor for the San Francisco Chronicle, who has covered the Oscar Grant case since the shooting, through the entire Mehserle trial. I asked him a few questions over the phone about this photograph. 


How did the prosecution and defense use this photograph as evidence in the trial?
Both sides used flat screen TVs, multimedia, everything was timed and choreographed. It seemed they felt they might lose credibility if they weren’t sharp with multimedia. At times the arguments felt like PowerPoint presentations. There were photos, quotes, videos, video of the Taser training. 

It was used by prosecution to show two things: 1. that he [Mehserle] knew his Taser from his gun, that he had actually taken out his Taser twice, that he knew full well between the two weapons. 2. That Oscar was being abused and was concerned about it.

It was one of many pieces of evidence. It’s part of the puzzle, and hard to tell which ones stuck with the jury.

What facts were presented about the photograph, when it was taken? Did he take it while face down, turning around?
Grant was sitting on the ground. The guys were sitting on the edge of the platform for a while. He wouldn’t have had the opportunity in the last moments, the officers were on top of him, with his arms behind him.  

Was there any suggestion by either side that taking this photograph provoked Mehserle, or was some form of resisting arrest?
I don’t recall.

Based on the evidence in the trial, and your own speculation, why do you think Oscar Grant took this photograph?

Most likely he was documenting unfair treatment. He said something to his girlfriend [during the phone call], like “I’m getting beat up here.” It was a way of documenting that, and putting Mehserle on notice. If you take a picture of someone you are saying: I’m watching your behavior. You’re accountable. You are expressing your concern and putting them on notice.

    Oscar Grant’s photograph of Johannes Mehserle

    This is a reblog of a post from several years ago. One feature of a militarized state is the suppression of civilian photography.

    Oscar Grant’s photograph of transit police officer Johannes Mehserle is rare: a portrait of the photographer’s killer. Unlike the recent photograph that a politician captured in the Philippines, Grant’s photograph, taken moments before Mehserle shot him in the back, was intentional.

    Much of the media attention given to the Oscar Grant case focused on a handful of videos made by other passengers on the BART train, some of which show Grant being shot. While being detained by BART police, Grant called his ex-girlfriend Sophina Mesa twice from the platform. During this time he also took the photo of Mehserle and sent it to Mesa. Grant’s photograph of Mehserle did not get as much coverage as the videos, as it wasn’t released until the trial began.

    Grant’s photograph raises an important issue that faces every American: the right to photograph, videotape and document while being detained or arrested by the police. Many of us assume we have this right, but with existing wiretapping laws, you can still be arrested and your camera confiscated. Radley Balko’s Reason.com article “The War on Cameras" is essential reading on this subject.

    Demian Bulwa is a reporter and editor for the San Francisco Chronicle, who has covered the Oscar Grant case since the shooting, through the entire Mehserle trial. I asked him a few questions over the phone about this photograph.

    How did the prosecution and defense use this photograph as evidence in the trial?

    Both sides used flat screen TVs, multimedia, everything was timed and choreographed. It seemed they felt they might lose credibility if they weren’t sharp with multimedia. At times the arguments felt like PowerPoint presentations. There were photos, quotes, videos, video of the Taser training.

    It was used by prosecution to show two things: 1. that he [Mehserle] knew his Taser from his gun, that he had actually taken out his Taser twice, that he knew full well between the two weapons. 2. That Oscar was being abused and was concerned about it.

    It was one of many pieces of evidence. It’s part of the puzzle, and hard to tell which ones stuck with the jury.

    What facts were presented about the photograph, when it was taken? Did he take it while face down, turning around?

    Grant was sitting on the ground. The guys were sitting on the edge of the platform for a while. He wouldn’t have had the opportunity in the last moments, the officers were on top of him, with his arms behind him.

    Was there any suggestion by either side that taking this photograph provoked Mehserle, or was some form of resisting arrest?

    I don’t recall.

    Based on the evidence in the trial, and your own speculation, why do you think Oscar Grant took this photograph?

    Most likely he was documenting unfair treatment. He said something to his girlfriend [during the phone call], like “I’m getting beat up here.” It was a way of documenting that, and putting Mehserle on notice. If you take a picture of someone you are saying: I’m watching your behavior. You’re accountable. You are expressing your concern and putting them on notice.

    14 August 2014

    reblogged from: bremser | notes: 1320 | tagged: notes |

     
     
  7. Gustavo Gomes

    Gustavo Gomes

     
     
  8. Jin Zhu

    Jin Zhu

    13 August 2014 | source: killeryellow.com

    notes: 15 | tagged: the arms | download image

     
     
  9. Three online versions of Paul Nougé’s Le bras revelateur, ca. 1929-30. Background on Nougé’s series here and here.

  10. 12 August 2014

    notes: 52 | tagged: the arms |

     
     
  11. Logan White, from Italo

    Logan White, from Italo

    11 August 2014

    reblogged from: mpdrolet | notes: 471 | tagged: the arms | download image